All Health Care, All the Time

The President again stays on the subject of health care reform. He debunks the more obvious lies emanating from the attack machine of the right, especially the “death panel” rumor embraced by so many Republicans, including from some who have supported the counseling program twisted so severely into “death panels.” There is plenty to debate about health care in the United States, but the nonsense put out during this debate is startling. There is a lot more ground to cover on this subject, and the debate will be fierce. The Democrats have some choices to make, and a big one will be whether they should just go it alone. Republicans may not be able to participate in a bipartisan solution with all of the pressure being put on by the Republican talk masters who appear to be in functional control of the Republican Party. Will the President get a bill, and if he does will it contain a public option? Should the Democrats be with a bill that does not have a public option??

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10 Responses to All Health Care, All the Time

  1. Jules Gordon says:

    Your Honor,

    Let me sum it up this way. Obama’s Socialist Healthcare is dead.

    A little bit of Luck, Obama’s Money sucking Cap and Tax for his friends is dead.

    With some more luck Obama’s second term is dead.

    Jules

    Like

  2. Fred Mertz says:

    Mr. Mayor:

    After this month, I believe that the President should declare bipartisanship for bipartisan’s sake dead. You cannot appease the non-rational, so you can either dip down to their level (which I don’t think that Democrats are particularly good at), or you can marginalize them. The election proved that the Republican party is now a regionalized party of the South, and Democrats need to keep the pressure on. It’s the only way I see to bring sanity back to the public debate: you have to show the tactics will lose you elections.

    First more, then better.

    Without a public health option, the Democrats should walk away from the bill, or Obama should veto if one is proposed. And if we can link Medicare and Congressional health care to the bill that’s eventually passed, so much the better.

    I’ve begun to think that there are going to have to be multiple health care bills to get the intended effect. If that’s the game, so be it.

    -FM

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  3. Bill Manzi says:

    Fred,

    It is so unfortunate that a public policy question that has such a fundamental impact on just about every part of American society can be brought into the sewer. But I must reluctantly agreee with you that it does not seem possible to have a sane debate with these folks. When members of the bipartisan working group in the Senate begin to parrot the death panels hogwash you have to question whether the effort is worth anything. I am startled that the Republicans would choose to leave this system in place, knowing that it will have to be dealt with, either voluntarily or involuntarily. I say this even conceding that there are some very legitimate debating points on Democratic proposals. I agree that multiple bills could be needed, but I fear that when any bill is passed all involved will walk away declaring victory, fearful of negative political impacts in the 2010 midterms. Unfortunately that would go for a deficient bill as well. Your post on bipartisanship reminds me of the Globe editorial page drawing by Wasserman.
    Bill

    Like

  4. Gerard Donahue says:

    Mayor Manzi, Jules and Fred:

    Senator’s Orrin Hatch response to President Obama’s weekly address.

    http://www.c-span.org/Watch/Media/2009/08/15/HP/A/22232/Republican+Weekly+Address+on+Health+Care+by+Sen+Orrin+Hatch+RUT.aspx

    Gerard

    Like

  5. Fred Mertz says:

    Mr. Mayor:

    I think there is a reality show called something like “Nanny 911”, which teaches parents how to deal with children throwing tantrums. Maybe we should petition for the Democrats in Congress to watch and see if they can pick up pointers? Maybe Rahm Emmanual can come up with the requisite coursework, because up to now, I’m not sure he’s earned his paycheck …

    As for the 2010 midterms: I think the Democrat’s problem may come from the left. I briefly worked for the Obama campaign last fall, and I didn’t do it to see the status quo survive and prosper. The argument that you don’t reward poor behaviour goes equally for both parties, to my mind.

    I can think of only three Democrats that I’d pull the lever for right now: Obama, Senator Kennedy, and you. Everyone else better start finding a pair, and fast.

    I saw the Wasserman comic: he’s been on a roll lately.

    The thing I see with the bills is that they don’t yet do enough for cost containment, and if the public option is not there to counter for-profit insurance, I don’t believe there will ever be enough. Republicans deep down want to kill both Medicare and Social Security, but they don’t have the stones to do it directly. If you believe Grover Nordquist, and you should, they’ll eventually do it by bankrupting both programs and the country in the process. That explains the cut taxes, spend wildly mantra of the Republicans since Reagan nicely. If the Democrats stop short and do not put both programs and the rest of healthcare on solid financial footing now, Republicans will win the long game if they achieve power again in this generation. Longer term, I’m not so worried, because angry old white guys are a shrinking minority in this country, and the younger generation seems to get it.

    PS: just got my health insurance premium renewal in the mail today: rates are up 15% over last year. I wonder how much of my premiums are going into lobbying against public health care options?

    -FM

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  6. Bill Manzi says:

    Fred,

    I do believe Grover, and I do believe that your analysis is dead on. They are as against Social Security and Medicare as they are against the reforming of health care, but they truly do not have the guts to say so publicly. Anyone who can read numbers can tell you that our current system is bankrupting the country. Your 15% rate hike has been the norm for the past ten to fifteen years. Just push those numbers out another five and you can see what financial armageddon will look like. And although I realize that the political system requires compromise I am moving towards the view that no bill is better than a bill that will not restrain cost. And the Republicans will do whatever the Dems allow them to gut cost containment. Reconciliation at 51 votes in the Senate is looking more attractive by the day.

    Bill

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  7. Jules Gordon says:

    To all Democratic Bloviators,

    The White house is changing strategy again. Shifting to ‘Insurance only’ legislation.

    So to summarize;

    1. There is no plan except HR 3200 on the table. All else does not exists.

    2. The President is side slipping.

    Like the President, you guys are talking BS.

    ore to come.

    Jules

    Like

  8. Fred Mertz says:

    Jules:

    As usual, a well reasoned, non-bloviated post. Congratulations!

    -FM

    Like

  9. Jules Gordon says:

    Why, Fred, thank you.

    Jules

    Like

  10. Fred Mertz says:

    Mr. Mayor:

    I see signs that the Democrats are waking up (rather belatedly) to the fact that they’re not going to get Republican support, and may as well go it alone on a healthcare bill.

    Our friend Rahm looks like he’s finally engaging … now, what are the chances that they put Republicans in a box and tie Medicare to the reform package?

    Round two bell coming up …

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/19/health/policy/19repubs.html?_r=1&hp

    -FM

    Like

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